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Pope Francis’ Revolution: Conquer Arrogance and Contentment | Mark Shriver

His Holiness Pope Francis wants to see the end of two things in this world: red sauces at diplomatic dinners, and arrogance. Shriver’s book is Pilgrimage: My Search for the Real Pope Francis (https://goo.gl/Xw4jB4).

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Transcript – You know, in this book that I wrote called Pilgrimage: My Search for the Real Pope Francis I talked to not just Catholics, because Pope Francis has a slew of different friends in Argentina, in Rome and around of the world of all of different faiths. I talked to a couple of the rabbis in Buenos Aires, a father who had lost his daughter in the bombing of the Jewish community center. I’ve talked to atheists and to Christians of other denominations. And what he really does, what Pope Francis does I think beautifully is challenge us all. You can be an atheist or you can not believe in organized religion and just try to develop your own relationship with God. You can be in a more formal relationship with God through the Catholic Church or protestantism. It doesn’t matter. What he’s really trying to do is to challenge us from a place of joy, it’s not fill it with Catholic or Jewish guilt, it’s from a place of joy to want to develop a better relationship with God and to develop a better relationship with your fellow human beings.

He tells this great story about giving food to a woman who had to prostitute herself at times to feed her three young kids. The husband had a left her and she came around Christmas time to talk to at that point Father Bergoglio, Pope Francis, and she said, “Thank you for the food.” And he said, “I’m glad you got it.” And she said, “But what I really want to thank you for is you always called me señora.” And when you think about that, you know, he treated her with her dignity and respect. And too often in America, you know, just speaking on my own behalf, when you see a homeless person I try to avoid them. I don’t give them the money all the time; I don’t make eye contact with them; I surely don’t ask him his name or call him Sir or Misses. And what he’s teaching us through that gesture is that you have to treat each other with respect and with dignity. You have to enter the chaos and the confusion but also the joys of other people’s lives. And that takes getting out of your comfort zone, right. Read Full Transcript Here: https://goo.gl/tCqrgC.

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